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Eponyms - S

Author: Andrew J. Yee, M.D., Posted on Sunday, July 25 @ 00:00:00 IST by RxPG  

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Eponyms

SABIN-FELDMAN DYE TEST
serum titer rises in toxoplasma infection

SABOURAUD'S AGAR
for growing fungi, low pH of medium and chloramphenicol and cycloheximide

SAINT'S TRIAD
the association of 1. cholelithiasis, 2. hiatal hernia, 3. diverticular disease in a patient

SALUS'S SIGN
deflection of veins at AV crossings in hypertensive retinopathy (grade 2); c.f. Bonnet's and Gunn's sign


SAMTER'S TRIAD
nasal polyps, bronchial asthma, aspirin sensitivity

SANDHOFF'S DISEASE
AR sphingolipidosis beta-hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, same symptoms as Tay-Sachs but more rapid progression of disease

SANFILIPPO'S SYNDROME
mucopolysaccharidosis, four types (A-D) from deficiency of enzymatic steps necessary for removal of N-sulfated or N-acetylated glucosamine residues from heparan sulfate, leading to mental retardation, CNS disorders, coarse facies

SANTORINI, DUCT OF
dorsal duct of pancreas, embryologically, the biggest duct, clinically the smaller pancreatic duct

SANTOS'S SYNDROME
Hirschsprung's disease with renal agenesis, polydactyly, hypertelorsim, and deafness

SATURDAY NIGHT PALSY
radial neuropathy from compression at the spiral groove

SCAHMBERG'S DISEASE
idiopathic capillaritis in which inflammation weakens capillaries, causes petechial lesions like cayenne pepper

SCHAFER'S MANEUVER
extensor plantar response by squeezing Achilles tendon suggesting upper motor neuron defect

SCHAMROTH'S WINDOW TEST
for testing clubbing

SCHATZKI'S RING
esophageal rings and webs in lower esophagus, located at or just above the squamocolumnar junction; most common cause of intermittent solid food obstruction

SCHAUMANN'S BODIES
laminated concretions composed of calcium and proteins, seen in granulomatous diseases (e.g. sarcoidosis)

SCHEIE'S SYNDROME
mucopolysaccharidosis (I S), from alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency (related to Hurler's syndrome), resulting in corneal clouding, stiff joints, aortic valve disease, normal intelligence and life span, because of defect in degradation of dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate

SCHICK'S TEST
for testing immune status to Cornyebacterium diphtheriae, intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of purified standardized toxin; if no inflammation, antitoxin present

SCHILLING TEST
first stage, measuring cobalamin (B12) absorption by determining how much p.o. radioactive cobalamin is excreted in urine over 24 to 48 hours (after i.m. inj inj B12 to saturate the transcobalamines and to "flush" orally absorbed radiolabeled B12 into the urine). Second stage, test repeated with oral intrinsic factor, should normalize B12 absorption in pernicious anemia but not in intestinal malabsorption

SCHIRMER'S TEST
measures quantity of tears secreted in 5 minutes in response to irritation from a filter strip placed under each lower eyelid; normal young person moistens 15 mm; 33% of elderly wet only 10 mm in 5 minutes; in Sjögren's syndrome, <5 mm in 5 min, 85% sensitivity, 85% specificity

SCHLESINGER'S SOLUTION
morphine and scopolamine

SCHMID METAPHYSEAL CHONDRODYSPLASIA
mutation in collagen X, mechanical pressure reduces growth

SCHMIDT'S SYNDROME
type II polyglandular syndrome, coexistent adrenal and thyroid disease, sometimes accompanied by IDDM

SCHOBER TEST
measures distraction between 2 marks on the skin during forward flexion in ankylosing spondylitis

SCHULTZ-CHARLTON PHENOMENON
was observed after intradermal inj of 0.1 mL of antitoxin into an area of scarlet fever rash that produced "blanching" at the site of injection within 12-24 h. The test has to be performed during the very early phase of the eruption before exudation into the lesion made skin changes irreversible.

SCHWACHMAN-DIAMOND-OSKI SYNDROME
combination of neutropenia, metaphyseal dysplasia, and pancreatic insufficiency, AR trait

SCHWARTZ'S DICTUM
no acid, no ulcer

SCOTT SYNDROME
defect in primary homeostasis, prolonged PT, deficient in platelet coagulant activity which provides the phospholipid surface and landing pad for prothrombinase in the presence of calcium

SEGAWA SYNDROME
hereditary progressive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuaion from defect in GTP cyclohydrase I, cofactor for synthesis of dopamine; dystonia treatable with levodopa

SELDINGER TECHNQIUE
guide wire-assisted vascular cannulation, i.e., small-bore needle first used to enter vessel, then wire passed through needle, needle removed, leaving wire in place for guiding cannulation of vessel, developed in 1953

SELIGMANN'S DISEASE
? heavy chain disease, characterized by infiltration of the lamina propria of the small intestine with lymphoplasmacytoid cells that secrete truncated ? chains

SELLICK'S MANEUVER
cricoid pressure during intubation

SENEAR-USHER SYNDROME
pemphigus erythematosus; a localized variety of pemphigus foliaceus confined to seborrheic sites

SENGSTAKEN-BLAKEMORE TUBE
tube a double-balloon system, one for stomach, one for esophagus, for tamponade of bleeding varices

SERTOLI CELL TUMORS
testicular tumor derived from the sex cord

SEVER'S DISEASE
apophysitis of the calcaneus, common (but frequently source of heel pain), condition occurs before or during the peak growth spurt, often resolves two weeks or two months after initiation of conservative treatment

SÉZARY'S SYNDROME
rare special variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma characterized by generalized or universal erythroderma, peripheral lymphadenopathy, and cellular infiltrates of atypical lymphocytes (Sézary cells) in the skin and blood

SÉZARY-LUTZNER CELLS
found in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, T-helper cells that characteristically form band-like aggregates within the superficial dermis and invade the epidermis as single cells and small clusters (Pautrier's microabcesses)

SHEEHAN'S SYNDROME
postpartum pituitary necrosis, syndrome results from sudden infarction of the anterior lobe precipitated by obstetric hemorrhage or shock (pregnancy, pituitary enlarges to almost twice its normal size, compressing blood supply)

SHIRAZ DWARFISM
zinc deficiency, in Iran, short stature and aspermia

SHOHL'S SOLUTION
alkalinizing citrate solution in hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism associated with renal tubular acidosis associated with diabetic nephropathy

SHULMAN'S SYNDROME
eosinophilic fasciitis, characterized by acute onset of erythema, swelling, induration of the extremities, and eosinophlia, often following exercise; epidermis and dermis normal

SHWACHMAN'S SYNDROME
pancreatic insufficiency and bone marrow dysfunction

SHWARTZMAN REACTION
two iv injections of sublethal lipopolysaccharide, 24 hrs apart, causing DIC in rabbits; TNF obligatory mediator

SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME
degenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonian features (leading to postural hypotension, anhidrosis, disturbance of sphincter control, impotence, etc.) and signs of more widespread neurologic involvement (pyramidal or lower motor neuron signs and often a cerebellar deficit)

SIEGRIST STREAKS
linear hyperpigmented areas over choroidal vessels in hypertensive retinopathy

SILK GLOVE SIGN
indirect hernia sac in the pediatric patient; the sac feels like a finger of a silk glove when rolled under the examining finger

SIMMOND'S DISEASE
pituitary cachexia (e.g. from Sheehan's syndrome)

SIMS-HUHNER TEST
post coital test, done 2-4 hrs after intercourse to assess number and motility of sperm that have entered the cervical canal

SINGERS'S NODULE
is a small, benign laryngeal polyp, usually induced by chronic irritation, such as excessive use of the voice, and is associated most commonly with heavy cigarette smoking; is usually localized to the true vocal cords

SIPPLE'S SYNDROME
MEN type IIa; pheochromacytoma, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, and hyperparathyroidism due to hyperplasia or tumor

SISTER MARY JOSEPH NODULE
abdominal carcinoma, especially gastric, may metastasize to the navel; Sister Joseph, in the early days of the Mayo Clinic, noted periumbilical nodules in patients with intraabdominal cancer

SJÖGREN'S SYNDROME
lymphocytic infiltration affects salivary and lacrimal glands and is associated with dry mouth and dry eyes (keratoconjunctivitis sicca); may have either interstitial pulmonary fibrosis or a lymphocytic infiltration of the alveolar walls (may have a malignant transformation with the development of a lymphoma)

SKENE'S GLANDS
paraurethral glands in women

SKIRROW'S MEDIUM
contains vancomycin, trimethoprim, cephalothin, polymixin, and amphotericin B; for growing e.g. Campylobacter

SLY'S SYNDROME
mucopolysaccharidosis (VII), from beta-glucoronidase deficiency, resulting in hepatosplenomegaly, physical deformity from defect in degradation of dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate

SMITH'S FRACTURE
opposite of Colle's fracture; fracture of the distal radius, but from falling on the dorsum of the hand

SNEDDON'S SYNDROME
livedo reticularis associated with stroke-like episodes

SOMOGYI PHENOMENON
rebound hyperglycemia following an episode of hypoglycemia due to counterregulatory hormone release

SPANISH FLU
1918 influenza with 20-100 million deaths worldwide with 2.5% mortality (influenza normally 0.1% mortality)

SPIGELIAN HERNIA
hernia through the linea semilunaris, aka spontaneous lateral ventral hernia

SPURLING'S TEST
for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy, exerting downward pressure on the head while rotating the head towards the symptomatic side creating pain radiating into affected extremity

ST. ANTHONY'S FIRE
ergotism; disease caused by excess ergot alkaloid; classically an epidemic caused by consumption of grain that's contaminated by the ergot fungus; any of several inflammations or gangrenous conditions of the skin (erysipelas)

ST. JUDE VALVE
prosthetic valve with two semicircular discs that pivot between open and closed positions without supporting struts

ST. VITUS'S DANCE
q.v. Sydenham's chorea

STARR-EDWARDS VALVE
ball and cage valve, oldest prosthetic valve in continuous use

STAUFFER'S SYNDROME
elevation of LFTs due to cholestasis in renal cell carcinoma

STEELE-RICHARDSON-OLSZEWSKI SYNDROME
aka progressive supranuclear palsy

STEIN-LEVENTHAL SYNDROME
polycystic ovarian disease

STELLWAG'S SIGN
incomplete and infrequent blinking in Graves's disease

STENSEN'S DUCT
parotid duct, enters oral cavity opposite crown of second maxillary molar tooth

STEVENS-JOHNSON SYNDROME
extensive and symptomatic febrile form of erythema multiforme, more common in children; 1-6 cases/million person-years

STEWART-TREVE SYNDROME
lymphedema following mastectomy leading to lymphangiosarcoma

STICKLER SYNDROME
mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, osteoarthritis, and sensorineural hearing loss, some forms associated with a dominant negative mutation in the human COL11A2 gene encoding the ?2(XI) chain; another form of Stickler syndrome from mutation in COL2A1

STILL'S DISEASE, ADULT ONSET
polyarthritis associated with sudden onset of high spiking fever, sore throat, and an evanescent erythematous salmon-colored rash

STILL'S MURMUR
described by George Still in 1909; normal vibratory midsystolic murmur; innocent murmur

STOCKHOLM SYNDROME
victims sympathizing with victimizer, e.g., kidnapper

STOKES-ADAMS ATTACKS
fainting spells associated with complete heart block (or other types of bradycardia)

STRANSKY'S SIGN
involuntary dorsiflexion of the toes after firmly abducting the 5th digit for 2 seconds, and then acutely letting it go in upper motor neuron defects

STROOP TEST
stress test, also used for checking frontal function, where patients are tested for the ability to read off the text color of text spelling potentially different colors

STRÜMPELL'S SIGN
involuntary pronation of the forearm/wrist with passive extension and flexion of the arm at the elbow in upper motor neuron defect

STURGE-WEBER SYNDROME
association of port-wine stain with vascular malformations in the eye (glaucoma) and leptomeninges and superficial calcifications of the brain; attributed to faulty development of certain mesodermal and ectodermal elements, and associated with mental retardation, seizures, hemiplegia, and radiopacities in the skull

SUDECK'S SYNDROME
reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome occurring in older people characterized by cystic changes and subchondral erosion in bone, diffiuse osteoporosis, and muscle atrophy, but not necessarily associated with trauma

SUSAC SYNDROME
microangiopathy of the inner ear, retina, and brain leading to deafness, retinal artery occlusion, and encephalopathy

SWEET'S SYNDROME
acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis or Sweet syndrome, initially described in 1964 by Robert Sweet. It is characterized fever, neutrophilic leucocytosis, abrupt appearance of erythematous, painful, cutaneous plaques and dense dermal infiltrate consisting of mature neutrophils without vasculitis signs.

SYDENHAM'S CHOREA
aka St. Vitus's dance A postinfectious chorea appearing several months after a streptococcal infection with subsequent rheumatic fever. The chorea typically involves the distal limbs and is assoc. with hypotonia and emotional lability. Improvement occurs over weeks or months and exacerbations occur without assoc. infection occurrence.

SYLVIAN AQUEDUCT
cerebral aqueduct of the midbrain that connects the third and fourth ventricle


Note: Eponyms Database Author: Andrew J. Yee, M.D. (website: eponyms.net)

You can also revise eponyms using eponyms revision tool available at Eponyms Crammer



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